Friday, November 09, 2007




Newspaper Correction of the Month
(If Not Year)

By Editor & Publisher Staff


NEW YORK
A reader, Howard Bailen, sends along the following, from the November 4 edition of The Telegraph in London:

Correction: Lady Jeanne Campbell. "Our obituary of Lady Jeanne Campbell (Sept 22) said she had a daughter, Cusi Cram, 'possibly by a man called Guy Nicholas Lancaster.' In fact Mr. Lancaster is Ms. Cram’s brother-in-law and was only five when she was born. We apologise to all concerned for our error."

(I didn't even have to rewrite the headline -- though I did a quick Google to find out who had that name. I then Googled to find out who "Guy Nicholas Lancaster" was and pulled up the original obit, which is certainly worth reading. I guess I can see how the writer might get tangled up in the research.)

UPDATE:
About six weeks after her own death, Lady Jeanne's first husband, Norman Mailer, has died. She was his third wife, the one he stabbed was his second. I'm not sure what that says about her judgment but we already know she had a taste for adventure. Perhaps it was a taste easily satisfied: They were only married for a year, during which time Kate Mailer was conceived.

2 comments:

ronnie said...

They are completely ignoring the possibility that Guy Nicholas Lancaster might have been a particularly precocious child...

Northumbrian said...

Guy Nicholas Lancaster, my first cousin, may or may not have been precocious before he was in Kindergarten ... It might interest some that Guy's grandparents (and mine) were cotton mill workers in Harle Syke, Lancashire, sent off to work at age eleven, before World War One. Guy and Kate's daughter is, therefore, descended from peers, press barons, writers, actors, Jews and Presbyterians, and Methodists and converts to Catholicism, and Scots and Sassenachs, the plain and the ultra-worldly, the well-spoken and those with impossible dialects, the travelled and the people who rarely left the village, the educated and the baffled, the tall aristocracy and the squat peasantry. That sort of heritage ... storybook stuff ...